After the collapse of the USSR in 1991, Soviet television looked old-fashioned and seemed redundant, with the emerging post-Soviet televisual cultures turning their gazes to global sources of inspiration. The next decade affected Russia and Ukraine in very different ways. In Russia brief exposure to what was seen as “cheap mass-culture” left TV viewers and producers disillusioned. With the change of attitude towards Western TV, the ideas about Soviet TV changed, too. From a grey and unexciting model Soviet TV had become a shining example of “high quality” and nostalgia-driven content set in for the next few years. In Ukraine, where no domestic TV had existed as such prior to 1991 and where Soviet TV was rapidly fading into the past (and some-one else’s past, too), a decade of experimenting with programming had left the TV producers much more open to global television formats and Western ideas, developing programmes very different than the Russian ones.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Russia, Ukraine, post-Soviet, global, Soviet, KVN, Pugacheva, Kobzon, Vakarchuk
Publisher Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Journal VIEW Journal
Rights Each article is copyrighted © by its author(s) and is published under license from the author(s). When a paper is accepted for publication, authors will be requested to agree with the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Netherlands License.
Note VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture; Vol 1, No 2 (2012): Europe on and Behind the Screens; 94-104
Citation
Khinkulova, Kateryna. (2012). Hello, Lenin? Nostalgia On Post-Soviet Television In Russia And Ukraine. VIEW Journal, 1(2), 94–104.

Additional Files
cover.jpg Cover Image , 271kb