Digitisation of historic TV material is driven by the widespread perception that archival material should be made available to diverse users. Yet digitisation alters the material, taking away any lingering sense of presence. Digitisation and online access, however, offer startling new possibilities. The article offers three: use of material in language teaching and learning; use in dementia therapy; and applications as data in medical research. All depend on ordinary TV for their effectivity.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Digitisation, television, history, dementia, archive, remediation, media archaeology
Publisher Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2012.jethc005
Journal VIEW Journal
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Note VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture; Vol 1, No 1 (2012); 27-33
Citation
Ellis, John. (2012). Why Digitise Historical Television?. VIEW Journal, 1(1), 27–33. doi:10.18146/2213-0969.2012.jethc005