In this article I will argue that we need to create new archival models in order to preserve and share knowledge of historical, ‘hidden’ television professions and production cultures. Oral history traditions of recording life stories give us a useful starting point. Engineering ‘encounters’ between skilled television technicians, and the now obsolete equipment they operated in the 1970s and 80s, is challenging for a myriad of reasons, but videoing the interaction of man and machine provides us with a rich insight into how analogue television was produced and broadcast. Social media enables us to disseminate these histories in new and innovative ways.

Television, Online, Archive, Analogue
Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision
dx.doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2013.jethc040
VIEW Journal
Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0)
VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture; Vol 2, No 4 (2013); 3-14

Jackson, Vanessa. (2013). Revealing Television's Analogue Heroes. VIEW Journal, 2(4), 3–14. doi:10.18146/2213-0969.2013.jethc040